Insert a, an or the if necessary.
1There was . . .knock on . . .door. I opened it and found . . .small dark man in . . .blue
overcoat and . . .woollen cap.
2He said he was . . .employee of . . .gas company and had come to read . . .meter.
3But I had . . .suspicion that he wasn’t speaking . . .truth because . . .meter readers
usually wear . . .peaked caps.
4However, I took him to . . .meter, which is in . . .dark corner under . . .stairs
(. . .meters are usually in . . .dark corners under . . . stairs).
5I asked if he had . . .torch; he said he disliked torches and always read . . .meters by . .
.light of . . .match.
6I remarked that if there was . . .leak in . . . gaspipethere might be . . .explosion while
he was reading . . .meter.
7He said, ‘As . . .matter of . . .fact, there was . . .explosion in . . . last house I visited;
and Mr Smith, . . .owner of . . .house, was burnt in . . .face.’
8 ‘Mr Smith was holding . . .lighted match at . . .time of . . . explosion.’
9To prevent . . .possible repetition of this accident, I lent him . . . torch.
10He switched on . . .torch, read . . .meter and wrote . . .reading down on . . .back of .
. .envelope.
11I said in . . .surprise that . . .meter readers usually put . . .readings down in . . .book.
12He said that he had had . . .book but that it had been burnt in . . . fire in . . .Mr
Smith’s house.
13By this time I had come to . . .conclusion that he wasn’t . . .genuine meter reader;
and . . .moment he left . . .house I rang . . .police.
14Are John and Mary . . .cousins? ~
No, they aren’t . . .cousins; they are . . .brother and . . .sister.
15 . . .fog was so thick that we couldn’t see . . .side of . . .road. We followed . . .car in
front of us and hoped that we were going . . . right way.
16I can’t remember . . .exact date of . . .storm, but I know it was . . . Sunday because
everybody was at . . .church. On . . .Monday . . . post didn’t come because . . .roads
were blocked by . . .fallen trees.
17Peter thinks that this is quite . . .cheap restaurant.
18There’s been . . .murder here.~
Where’s . . .body?~
There isn’t . . .body.~
Then how do you know there’s been . . .murder?
19Number . . .hundred and two, – . .house next door to us, is for sale.
It’s quite . – .nice house with . . .big rooms. . . .back windows look out on . . .park.
20I don’t know what . . .price . . .owners are asking. But Dry and Rot are . . .agents.
You could give them . . .ring and make them . . . offer.
21 . . .postman’s little boy says that he’d rather be . . .dentist than . . . doctor, because . .
.dentists don’t get called out at . . .night.

22Just as . . .air hostess (there was only one on the plane)was handing me . . .cup of . .
.coffee . . .plane gave . . .lurch and . . .coffee went all over . . .person on . . .other
side of . . .gangway.
23There was . . .collision between . . .car and . . .cyclist at . . . crossroads near . . .my
house early in . . .morning. . . .cyclist was taken to . . .hospital with . . .concussion.
. . .driver of . . .car was treated for . . .shock. . . .witnesses say that . . .car was
going at . . .seventy miles . . .hour.
24Professor Jones, . . .man who discovered . . .new drug that everyone is talking about,
refused to give . . .press conference.
25Peter Piper, . . .student in . . .professor’s college, asked him why he refused to talk
to . . .press.
26We’re going to . . .tea with . . .Smiths today, aren’t we? Shall we take . . .car? ~
We can go by . . .car if you wash . . .car first. We can’t go to . . . Mrs Smith’s in . . .
car all covered with . . .mud.
27He got . . .job in . . .south and spent . . .next two years doing . . . work he really
enjoyed.
28It is . . .pleasure to do . . .business with such . . .efficient organization.
29 . . .day after . . .day passed without . . .news, and we began to lose … hope.
30Would you like to hear . . .story about . . .Englishman, . . . Irishman and . . .
Scotsman?~
No. I’ve heard . . .stories about . . .Englishmen, . . .Irishmen and . . .Scotsmen
before
and they are all . . .same.
31But mine is not . . .typical story. In my story . . .Scotsman is generous, . . .Irishman
is logical and . . .Englishman is romantic.~
Oh, if it’s . . .fantastic story I’ll listen with . . .pleasure.
32My aunt lived on . . .ground floor of . . .old house on . . .River Thames. She was
very much afraid of . . .burglars and always locked up . . .house very carefully
before she went to . . .bed. She also took . . .precaution of looking under . . .bed to
see if . . .
burglar was hiding there.
33 ‘. . .modern burglars don’t hide under . . .beds,’said her daughter.
I’ll go on looking just . . .same,’said my aunt.
34One morning she rang her daughter in . . .triumph.1found . . . burglar under . . .bed
. . .last night,’she said, ‘and he was quite . . . young man.’
35 . . .apples are sold by . . .pound. These are forty pence . . .pound.
36It was . . .windy morning but they hired . . .boat and went for . . . sail along . . .
coast. In . . -afternoon . . .wind increased and they soon found themselves in . . .
difficulties.


Exercise3(Two words separated by an oblique, e.g. the/his, indicate that
either is a possible answer. The first word is normally the preferred answer.)
1 a, the; a, a2an, the, the3a, the,-,-4the, a, the,-.-.(the) 5a,-,the,a6a, a/the,
an, the7a,-,an, the, the, the, the8a, the, the9a, a10the, the, the, the, an
11-.-.(the), a12a, the,
13the, a, the, the, the14-;-,-,-15The, the, the; the, the 16the, the, a,-:(the),
the, the,-17a18a; the; a: a19a, the: a, -;The, the20-,the;the; a, an21The, a,
a,-,-22the, a,
– , the, a, the, the, the, the23a, a, a, the, -,the; The, -, -;The, the, -; -, the,-,an
24the, the, a25a, the, the26-,the;the;-,the;-,a, – 27 a, the, the,-28a,-,an
29-,-, -,-30a, an, an, a:-, -, -, -,the31a; the, the, the: a,- 32 the, an, the; -,the,
-:the, the, a33-,-;the34-;a, the,-,a 35 -,the; a36a, a, a, the; the, the,-