b r o o k [bruk] n.
A brook is a small stream.
-+ Water flows down several brooks on the mountain.
cater [keitar] v.
To cater to someone means to provide them with all the things needed or wanted.
—►Bill was too sick to get out of bed, so his nurse catered to his needs.
considerate [kansidsrit] adj.
When someone is considerate, they pay attention to the needs of others.
-+ The considerate boy gave a present to his girlfriend on Valentine’s Day.
consumption [kansAmpJan] n.
The consumption of food or drink is the act of eating or drinking it.
-» These apples are too rotten for consumption.
criteria [kraitisria] n.
Criteria are factors on which a person judges or decides something.
—►Before she got the job, she had to meet all the necessary criteria.
CrUSt [krASt] n.
Crust is the tough outer part of a loaf of bread.
-* The little boy never ate the crust of his pizza.
degrade [digreid] v.
To degrade someone means to cause people to have shame.
-> The teacher degraded Bob when she announced his poor performance to the class
entitle [entaitl] V.
To entitle someone means to give them the rights to have or do something.
—»His golden ticket entitled him to sit in the front row at the concert.
eSCOrt [eskoirt] v.
To escort people means to safely accompany them to a place.
-* Her bodyguards escorted her to the movie theater.
external [ikstaxnal] adj.
When something is external, it is connected to an outer part.
—►It is warm inside my house, but the external temperature is freezing.facility [fasilati] n.
A facility is a building that exists for a particular purpose.
-* There are many educational facilities in big cities.
faculty [faekelti] n.
A faculty is a mental or physical ability.
—*The boy’s mental faculties impressed all of his teachers.
heap [hi:p] n.
A heap of things is a large pile of them.
-» After the building was torn down, all that was left was a heap of bricks.
hemisphere [hemisfiar] n.
A hemisphere is one half of the earth.
—*■In the northern hemisphere, the weather is usually warmest in July and August.
h o u n d [haund] n.
A hound is a type of dog that is often used for racing or hunting.
-* The men took their hounds with them when they went on the hunting trip.
impersonal [imparsanal] adj.
If something is impersonal, it is not friendly and makes people feel unimportant.
—►The boy felt scared on his first day at the big, impersonal high school.
ornament [ornament] n.
An ornament is an attractive object that people display in their homes.
-* The woman kept some colorful ornaments on the shelves.
pedestrian [pedestrian] n.
A pedestrian is a person who is walking on a street.
—►Cars should be careful when pedestrians are walking around.
sanctuary [saen/rtjueri] n.
A sanctuary is a place where people in danger can go to be safe.
—►The church was made into a sanctuary for homeless people in the winter.
spectator [spekteitar] n.
A spectator is someone who watches something, especially a sports event.
—►There were thousands of spectators at the big game.


The Old Hound
Elvis was a dog that loved to run. He possessed all the criteria to be a great racing dog.
He had long legs, lean muscles, and a strong heart. He was so good that he never lost a
race in the northern hemisphere. Spectators who bet on dog races always picked Elvis to
win.
After ten years of racing, however, Elvis was getting old. His faculties were not as strong
as they used to be. His owner got upset when Elvis started losing. Elvis’s owner wasn’t a
considerate person. He degraded the dog all the time. Finally, his owner decided to get rid
of him. He threw Elvis in his car and took him to the middle of the forest. He tossed him out
and drove away. Elvis was cold and scared. He decided to follow a brook into the city.
Elvis soon found out that the city was a big and impersonal place. Everywhere he went,
he saw signs that said, “No Dogs Allowed.” Pedestrians yelled at him. He was sad, hungry,
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was ready to give up when he heard a soft voice say, “What a beautiful hound!” Elvis looked
up and saw an old woman. She said, “You’re entitled to a better life than this. I can take
you to a sanctuary for old dogs like you. I’ll cater to all your needs. Would you like to come
with me?”
The woman escorted Elvis to a beautiful facility. There was a sign on the external door that
said, “Dogs Welcome!” The interior of the building was painted blue, and shiny ornaments
hung from the ceiling. There was a heap of tasty bones and bread crusts for consumption.
Elvis learned there were kind people in the world after all. He was so thankful that he jumped up and licked the woman’s face.