allocate [aelakeit] v.
To allocate something means to put it aside for a certain purpose or person.
-» The government allocated $100 million to aid the disaster relief effort.
appetizing [aepitaizirj] adj.
When food is appetizing, it looks and smells very good.
—» The appetizing plate of cookies was gone in half an hour.
blizzard [Wizard] n.
A blizzard is a severe snow storm with strong winds.
—►We did not dare to go outside during the terrible blizzard.
cavity [kaavati] n.
A cavity is a hole or space in something.
—►There was a small cavity in the wall of the cave where an animal lived.
c lo c k w is e [klakwaiz] adv.
If something moves clockwise, it moves in a circle in the same direction as a clock.
—* Turn the screw clockwise to tighten it.
concentric [kansentrik] adj.
When circles or rings are concentric, they have the same center.
—* The target was a series o f concentric circles.
courtesy [ko:rtasi] n.
Courtesy is the excellence of manners or social conduct.
—►Jenna always behaves with great courtesy when people visit her home.
Crisp [krisp] adj.
When food is crisp, it is hard or has a hard surface in a way that is pleasant.
—►My favorite snack is a bag of crisp, delicious potato chips.
discord [disko:rd] n.
Discord is disagreement or fighting between people.
—►There was much discord between the experts on the talk show.
frigid [frid3id] adj.
When something is frigid, it is extremely cold.
—»We decided not to go on the hike because the weather was too frigid.
generate [d3enareit] v.
To generate something means to cause it to develop or begin.
—* The mayor promised to generate new jobs and programs to help the poor.
glacial [gleijal] adj.
When something is glacial, it relates to large masses of ice that move slowly.
—* Penguins thrive in the glacial regions of Antarctica.
interchange [intartjeind3] n.
An interchange of ideas between people is a discussion of each person’s idea.
—*■There was an interchange of ideas between the groups.
locker [Idker] n.
A locker is a small cabinet with a lock where people store their possessions.
—* I keep my school books in my locker.
multicultural [rriAltikAltjaral] adj.
When something is multicultural, it relates to many different cultures.
—♦ Everyone was welcomed to attend the multicultural celebration.
omission [oumijen] n.
An omission is something that has been left out or not done.
—►Mike was upset because of the omission of his name during the ceremony.
O v e rs e e [ouvarsi:] v.
To oversee something means to make sure that it is being done properly.
—»His job was to oversee the progress of the construction project.
pierce [pi0rs] v.
To pierce something means to make a hole in it using a sharp object.
—>The arrow pierced the target in the very center.
replicate [replakeit] V.
To replicate something is to do it in the exact same way as someone before.
—►I would love to replicate my father’s achievements in school.
wavy [weivi] adj.
When something is wavy, it is not straight but has a series of curves.
—►The child drew wavy lines all over the piece of paper.


The Ice House
Last year, Erik constructed one of the world’s strangest houses in the glacial landscape
of northern Sweden. He called it the Ice House: a house made entirely of ice and snow. All
of the beds, chairs, tables, and walls are cold, hard sculptures of ice.
A group of architects and volunteers from all over the world traveled to the site of the Ice
House and began its construction. The multicultural group journeyed through blizzards and
frigid temperatures to reach the site. Once the builders arrived, there was an interchange
of ideas, and tools were allocated to each worker. An expert was selected to oversee the
building process to make sure there was no discord between the workers. Once a plan
was generated, they got right to work. The design was very unique; the builders couldn’t
replicate the design from normal houses.
The first step was to build the walls and ceiling. The builders used a metal frame to help
them build the structure. After the ice was in place, the frame was removed. The builders
then created furniture and art pieces. Designs were carved into each piece. One worker
carved big wavy lines, and another made tiny clockwise, concentric circles. Finally, the
workers carved small cavities in the roof and inserted colored lights. When the work was
finished, the beautiful house was ready for a resident to enjoy.
Living in the Ice House is an experience like no other. Erik stores his belongings in an
ice locker and lays out a sleeping bag on his ice bed. At dinner, he dines on a delicious
salad with crisp toppings. And for the main course, he enjoys appetizing fish caught from
a nearby river. The fish are pierced with icicles and served on ice plates. After dinner, he
gets ready for a cold night. The omission of heaters can be
too much for his visitors sometimes. Luckily, there
are warm rooms nearby, as a courtesy to people who get too cold.