aesthetic [eseetik] adj.
If something is aesthetic, then it is concerned with a love of beauty.
—►The dresses were noteworthy for their aesthetic design.
arrogant [aeragant] adj.
If someone is arrogant, they think that they are more important than others.
—►He is very arrogant. Even though he’s not the boss, he tells everyone what to do.
bias [baias] n.
A bias is a person’s likelihood to like one thing more than another thing.
-* The mothers had a natural bias for their own child’s picture.
C a n y o n [kaenjan] n.
A canyon is a narrow valley with steep walls through which a river often flows.
—►The canyon was so deep that the ground inside was covered in shadow.
creek [kri:k] n.
A creek is a stream or small river.
-* Only small fish lived in the shallow waters of the creek.
drill [dril] n.
A drill is a tool with a point that spins in order to make a hole.
—» The carpenter used the drill to make several holes in the wood.
executive [igzekjativ] n.
An executive is the top manager of a business.
—»After twenty years at the company, he finally became the executive.
fatigue [fati g] n.
Fatigue is a feeling of extreme tiredness.
—►After three days with little sleep, she was feeling a lot of fatigue.
incline [inklain] n.
An incline is a sharp rise in something, especially a hill or mountain.
—>This mountain has one of the steepest inclines in the world.
nasty [naesti] adj.
If something is nasty, then it is not nice or pleasant.
-+ The rotten apple left a nasty taste inside her mouth.perceive [p arshv] v.
To perceive something means to be aware of it.
—*He was talking loudly, so he did not perceive that the music had stopped.
primate [p raim eit] n.
A primate is a type of mammal that includes monkeys, apes, and humans.
—►Primates use their hands for such tasks as swinging from branches.
primitive [p rim ativ] adj.
If something is primitive, then it is simple, basic, and not very developed.
—►The computers of the 1980s are primitive compared to those of todays.
Stereotype [steriataip] n.
A stereotype is a general but often incorrect idea about a person or thing.
-*• There’s a stereotype that pigs are dirty animals. But they are rather clean.
sticky [stiki] adj.
If something is sticky, then it is covered with a substance that things stick to.
—►Place the sticky part of the tape against the paper, so it will cling to the wall.
termite [ta rm a it] n.
A termite is an insect that lives in groups and feeds on wood.
—*The wood we found was full of termites.
thereby [6£a:rbai] adv.
If something happens thereby an action, then it is the result of that action.
—►He didn’t score a goal, thereby ending his chance at setting a record.
trail [treil] n.
A trail is a path through a wild area.
—►A narrow trail cut through the field and over the hills.
twig [tw ig] n.
A twig is a short and thin branch from a tree or bush.
—* They started the fire with a handful of dry twigs.
welfare [welfear] n.
Welfare is the health and happiness of a person or group.
—►Having plenty of clean water is necessary for the welfare of people


The Man and the Monkey
While flying over a jungle, a wealthy executive’s private plane crashed. Some of the crew
were hurt, so the pilot decided to stay with them and wait for help. The arrogant executive,
though, didn’t care about the welfare of the pilot and crew. Rather, he thought he could
walkout of the jungle and find a town to stay in.
He followed a trail through a canyon and along a creek. The jungle was actually very
stunning. If the arrogant executive had stopped to look around, he might have perceived
the jungle’s beauty. But he was in a nasty mood and had no care for the aesthetic value of
the jungle. He continued to walk up the steep incline of the jungle’s hills.
Soon, he was lost. Several days passed, and fatigue and hunger weakened him. He was
very tired and afraid.
Just then, a monkey came out of the trees. It was carrying a twig covered in honey. It
walked up to a mound where termites lived. He then used the twig like a drill to make a
hole in the mound. Then very carefully, it removed the twig from the hole. The sticky twig
was covered with termites.
Instead of eating the bugs, the monkey offered them to the executive, but he didn’t
want what the monkey offered. He shouted at the monkey, “Get away from me, you stupid
primate!”
The executive’s stereotype of the monkey was wrong. The monkey was not stupid. It
knew how to find food, whereas the executive did not. He refused the help of the monkey,
thereby leaving himself to starve.
When the executive was finally found, he was very skinny and sick. He had not eaten
for a very longtime. Because he held a bias against the primitive ways of the monkey, he
had gone hungry and almost died. The executive didn’t understand that it was his arrogant
attitude that had caused all of his problems.